CALL TO ACTION: CALL YOUR STATE SENATOR!

Tell the New York Senate to Stop Playing Politics with Women’s Health-
Tell Her/Him to Support the Reproductive Health Act, Senate Bill # S5808

Call Your Senator Today!!!

To find your senator and her/his contact information
CLICK HERE
And Sign The Petition
CLICK HERE

What is the Reproductive Health Act?
The Reproductive Health Act guarantees a woman’s right to control her reproductive health; ensures that a woman will be able to have an abortion if her health is endangered; treats the regulation of abortion as an issue of public health and medical practice, rather than as a potential crime; and guarantees everyone the right to use or refuse contraception.

The Reproductive Health Act takes abortion out of the penal code, and regulates it as a matter of public health and medical practice.

The Reproductive Health Act protects the fundamental right of a woman and her doctor – not politicians – to make private medical decisions.

The Reproductive Health Act is sponsored by Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins and Assemblywoman Deborah Glick.

Why Does the Current Law Need to be Changed?In 1970, New York decriminalized abortion, three years before Roe v. Wade. It was one of the first states to do so. The law was visionary then, but today it is outdated and confusing. Current law does not contain the foundations upon which Roe was decided, including the fundamental right of women to make private medical decisions, nor does it take into account how abortion care is now provided.

The current law must be changed because under New York State’s present law, family planning and abortion are still treated as crimes in our statute books. Doctors should not have to fear prosecution because of the type of medicine they practice.

It also lacks protections if a woman’s health is endangered.

Furthermore, the current law is like icing on a cake; it has never been incorporated into NYS law, i.e. the batter. With one swift motion, it could be wiped away, and New York will be left with abortion being a crime as described in the penal code.

To learn more watch this video:

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